CP2110 Update for 2019

The last time I wrote about the CP2110 adapter was nearly a year ago, and because I have had a lot to keep me busy since, I have not been making much progress. But today I had some spare cycles and decided to take a deeper look starting from scratch again.

What I should have done properly since then would have been procuring myself a new serial dongle, as I was not (and still am) not entirely convinced about the quality of the CH341 adapter I’m using. I think I used that serial adapter successfully before, but maybe I didn’t and I’ve been fighting with ghosts ever since. This counts double as, silly me, I didn’t re-read my own post when I resumed working on this, and been scratching my head at nearly exactly the same problems as last time.

I have some updates first. The first of which is that I have some rough-edged code out there on this GitHub branch. It does not really have all the features it should, but it at least let me test the basic implementation. It also does not actually let you select which device to open — it looks for the device with the same USB IDs as I have, and that might not work at all for you. I’ll be happy to accept pull requests to fix more of the details, if anyone happen to need something like this too — once it’s actually in a state where it can be merged, I’ll be doing a squash commit and send a pull request upstream with the final working code.

The second is that while fighting with this, and venting on Twitter, Saleae themselves put me on the right path: when I said that Logic failed to decode the CP2110→CH341 conversation at 5V but worked when they were set at 3.3V, they pointed me at the documentation of threshold voltage, which turned out to be a very good lead.

Indeed, when connecting the CP2110 at 5V alone, Logic reports a high of 5.121V, and a low of ~-0.12V. When I tried to connect it with the CH341 through the breadboard full of connections, Logic reports a low of nearly 3V! And as far as I can tell, the ground is correctly wired together between the two serial adapters — they are even connected to the same USB HUB. I also don’t think the problem is with the wiring of the breadboard, because the behaviour is identical when just wiring the two adapters together.

So my next step has been setting up the BeagleBone Black I bought a couple of years ago and shelved into a box. I should have done that last year, and I would probably have been very close to have this working in the first place. After setting this up (which is much easier than it sounds), and figuring out from the BeagleBoard Wiki the pinout (and a bit of guesswork on the voltage) of its debug serial port, I could confirm the data was being sent to the CP2110 right — but it got all mangled on print.

The answer was that the HID buffered reads are… complicated. So instead of deriving most of the structure from the POSIX serial implementation, I lifted it from the RFC2217 driver, that uses a background thread to loop the reads. This finally allowed me to use the pySerial miniterm tool to log in and even dmesg(!) the BBB over the CP2110 adapter, which I consider a win.

Tomorrow I’ll try polishing the implementation to the point where I can send a pull request. And then I can actually set up to look back into the glucometer using it. Because I had an actual target when I started working on this, and was not just trying to get this to work for the sake of it.

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