How to run a tinderbox with my scripts

Hello there everybody, today’s episode is dedicated to set up a tinderbox instance like mine which is building and installing every visible package in the tree, running its tests and so on.

So first step is to have a system where to run the tinderbox. A virtual system is much preferred, since the tinderbox can easily install very insecure code, although nothing prevents you from running it straight on the metal. My choice for this, after Tiziano pointed me in that direction, was to get LXC to handle this, as a chroot on steroids (the original implementation used chroot and was much less reliable).

Now there are a number of degrees you could be running the tinderbox at; most of the basics are designed to work with almost every package in the system broken — there are only a few packages that are needed for this system to work, here’s my world file on the two tinderboxes:

app-misc/screen
app-portage/gentoolkit
app-portage/portage-utils
dev-java/java-dep-check
dev-lang/python:2.7
net-analyzer/netcat6
net-misc/curl

But let’s do stuff in order. What do I do when I run the tinderbox? I connect on SSH over IPv6 – the tinderbox has very limited Internet connectivity, as everything is proxied by a Squid instance, like I described in this two years old post – directly as root unfortunately (but only with key auth). Then I either start or reconnect to a screen instance, which is where the tinderbox is running (or will be running).

The tinderbox’s scripts are on git and are written partially by me and partially by Zac (following my harassment for the most part, and he’s done a terrific job). The key script is tinderbox-continuous.sh which is simply going to keep executing, either ad-infinitum, or going through a file given as parameter, the tinderbox on 200 packages at a time (this way there is emerge --sync from time to time so that the tree doesn’t get stale). There is also a fetch-reverse-deps.sh which is used to, as the cover says, fetch the reverse dependencies of a given package, which pairs with the continuous script above when I do a targeted run.

On the configuration side, /etc/portage/make.conf has to refer to /root/flameeyes-tinderbox/tinderbox.make.conf which comes from the repository and sets up features, verbosity levels, and the fetch/resume commands to use curl.. these are also set up so that if there is a TINDERBOX_PROXY environment variable set, then it’ll go through it. Setting of TINDERBOX_PROXY and a couple more variables is done in /etc/portage/make.tinderbox.private.conf; you can use it for setting GENTOO_MIRRORS with something that is easily and quickly reachable, as there’s a lot to download!

But what does this get us? Just a bunch of files in /var/log/portage/build. How do I analyze them? Originally I did this by using grep within Emacs and looked at it file by file. Since I was opening the bugs with Firefox running on the same system, so I could very easily attach the logs. This is no longer possible, so that’s why I wrote a log collector which is also available and that is designed in two components: a script that receives (over IPv6 only, and within the virtual network of the host) the log being sent with netcat and tar, removes colour escape sequences, and writes it down as an HTML file (in a way that Chrome does not explode on) on Amazon’s S3, also counting how many of the observed warnings are found, and whether the build, or tests, failed — this data is saved over SimpleDB.

Then there is a simple sinatra-based interface that can be ran on any computer, and I run it locally on my laptop, and fetches the data from SimpleDB, and displays it in a table with links to the build logs. This also has a link to the pre-filled bug template (it uses a local file where emerge --info is saved as comment #0.

Okay so this is the general gist of it, if I have some more time this weekend I’ll draw some cute diagram for it, and you can all tell me that it’s overcomplicated and that if I did it in $whatever it would have been much easier, but at the same time you’ll not be providing any replacement, or if you will start working on it, you’ll spend months designing the schema of the database, with a target of next year, which will not be met. I’ve been there.

One thought on “How to run a tinderbox with my scripts

  1. Thanks for the post. I always wondered which scripts and processes hold you tinderboxes together :)+1 for the last paragraph!

    Like

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