The battles and the losses

In the past years I picked up more than a couple of “battles” to improve Free Software quality all over. Some of these were controversial, like `–as-needed and some of them have been just lost causes (like trying to get rid of C++ strict requirements on server systems). All of those though, were fought with the hope of improving the situation all over, and sometimes the few accomplishments were quite a satisfaction by themselves.

I always thought that my battle for --as-needed support was going to be controversial because it does make a lot of software require fixes, but strangely enough, this has been reduced a lot. Most of the newly released software works out of the box with --as-needed, although there are some interesting exceptions, like GhostScript and libvirt. On the positive exceptions, there is for instance Luis R. Rodriguez, who made a new release of crda just to apply an --as-needed fix with a failure that was introduced in the previous release. It’s very refreshing to see that nowadays maintainers of core packages like these are concerned with these issues. I’m sure that when I’ve started working on --as-needed nobody would have made a new point release just to address such an issue.

This makes it much more likely for me to work on adding the warning to the new --as-needed and even more needed for me to find why ld fails to link PulseAudio libraries even though I’d have expected him to.

Another class of changes that I’ve been working on that have shown more interest around than I would have expected is my work on cowstats which, for the sake of self-interest, formed most of the changes in the ALSA 1.0.19 release for what concerns the userland part of the packages (see my previous post on the matter).

On this case, I wish first to thank _notadev_ for sending me Linkers and Loaders, that is going to help me improve Ruby-Elf more and more; thanks! And since I’m speaking of Ruby-Elf, I finally decided its fate: it’ll stay. My reasoning is that first of all I was finally able to get it to work with both Ruby 1.8 and 1.9 adding a single thin wrapper (that is going to be moved to Ruby Bombe once I actually finish that), and most importantly, the code is there, I don’t want to start from scratch, there is no point in that, and I think that both Ruby 1.9 and JRuby can improve from each other (the first losing the Global Interpreter Lock and the other one trying to speed up its starting time). And I could even decide to find time to write a C-based extension, as part of Ruby-Bombe, that takes care of byteswapping memory, maybe even using OpenMP.

Also, Ruby-Elf have been serving its time a lot with the collision detection script which is hard to move to something different since it really is a thin wrapper around PostgreSQL queries, and I don’t really like to deal with SQL in C. Speaking about the collision detection script, I stand by my conclusion that software sucks (but proprietary software stinks too).

Unfortunately while there are good signs to the issue of bundled libraries, like Lennart’s concerns with the internal copies of libltdl in both PulseAudio (now fixed) and libcanberra (also staged for removal) the whole issue is not solved yet, there are still packages in the tree with a huge amount of bundled libraries, like Avidemux and Ardour, and more scream to enter (and thankfully they don’t always do). -If you’d like to see the current list of collisions, I’ve uploaded the LZMA-compressed output of my script.- If you want you can clone Ruby-Elf and send me patches to extend the suppression files, to remove further noise from the file.

At any rate I’m going to continue my tinderboxing efforts, while waiting for the new disks, and work on my log analyser again. The problem with that is I really am slow at writing Python code, so I guess it would be much easier if I were to reimplement the few extra functions that I’m using out of Portage’s interface in Ruby and use those, or find a way to interface with Portage’s Python interface from Ruby. This is probably a good enough reason for me to stick with Ruby, sure Python can be faster, sure I can get better multithreading with C and Vala, but it takes me much less time to write these things with Ruby than it would take me in any of the other languages. I guess it’s a problem with the mindset.

And on the other hand, if I have problems with Ruby I should probably just find time to improve the implementation; JRuby is enough evidence to show that my beef against Ruby 1.9 runtime not supporting multithreading are an implementation issue and not a language issue.

3 thoughts on “The battles and the losses

  1. Hi Diego,Nice post. I sometimes forget how much you rock!Best wishes,AndersPS Are you going to submit more LWN articles? Or was it not worth the work?

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  2. Thanks a lot Anders :)I’d like to write more but Jonathan didn’t answer me about the last article I sent them so I’m in a bit of hiatus, but I’m working on something that falls into that context, I’ll write about it in a few days.

    Like

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