Inconsistent Scalable Vector Graphics

The one job I’m taking care of at the moment involves me drawing some stuff using SVG in C code, without using any support libraries. Without going into much detail, since I cannot because of an NDA, I can say the generated file has to be as small as possible since, as you might guess by now, it has to be done on an embedded system.

The task itself is not too difficult, but today I started the actual reduction of the code so that it fits in the software the I have to develop, and here starts the problems. The first issue has been I was tired of looking up the correct attributes for each SVG element, so I ended up doing the same I did for DocBook 5 and added a new ebuild to portage: app-emacs/nxml-svg-schemas:1.1 which installs the SVG 1.1 schemas so that Emacs’s nxml-mode can tab-complete the elements and attributes. I positively love Emacs and nXML since it allows me to have specific XML variants support by just adding its schemas to the system!

A little note now about nXML though: I’ll have to contact upstream because I found one nasty limitation of it: I cannot make it locate the correct shemas on a version basis, which means I won’t be able to provide SVG 1.2 schemas alongside as 1.1 with the code as it is; if I can get a new locating rules schemas that can detect the correct schema to use also through version, that’s going to solve not only SVG 1.2 but also future DocBook versions. So this enters my TODO list. Also, am I the only one using nXML in Gentoo? I’m maintaining all the three schemas ebuilds, it’s not like it’s a big hassle, but I wonder what would happen if I were to leave Gentoo — or more likely at this point if I were to end up in the hospital again; I hope I’m fine now but one is never sure, and my mindset is pretty pessimistic nowadays.

At any rate, I’ve been studying the SVG specifications to find a way to reduce the useless data in the generated file, without burdening the software with doing manual calculations. The easy way out is to use path and polyline elements to draw most of the lines in the file, which would be fine if it wasn’t they only accept coordinates in “pixels” (which are not actual pixel, but just the basic unit for the SVG file itself). This is not too bad since you can define a new viewport which can have an arbitrary size in “pixels”, and is stretched over the area. The problem is with supporting the extra viewports.

The target of the file to generate is to work on as many systems as possible, but it’s a requirement that it works on Windows with Internet Explorer, as well as Firefox. For SVG files under Internet Explorer there is the old, unmaintained and deprecated Adobe SVG plugin (which is still the default Internet Explorer will try to install) and the examotion Renesis Player which is still maintained. So I take out my test file, and try it.

I wrote the file testing it with eog which I’m not sure which SVG library uses for the rendering and with rsvg that uses librsvg obviously; with those, my test file was perfect, the problem has been with other software, since I got the following results:

  • Inkscape wouldn’t load it properly at all and just draw crazy stuff;
  • batik 1.6 worked;
  • Firefox, Safari and Opera shown me grey and red rectangles rather than the actual lines I wrote in the SVG;
  • Renesis Player shown me lines, but way too thick for what I wanted;
  • OpenOffice shown it with the right dimensions but didn’t translate it 2×2 cm down from the upper left corner like I instructed the svg to.

After reporting the issue on examotion’s tracker, since that is the most important failure in that list for my current requirements, I got a suggestion of switching the definition of font-size to direct attribute rather than through style so to change the actual svg measure unit. This made no difference for the three implementations that worked before, nor on examotion, but actually got me one step closer to the wished result:

  • inkscape still has problems, the white rectangle I draw to get a solid white background is positioned over the rest of the elements, rather than under like I’d expect since it’s the first element in the file; it also does not extend the grid like it should, so the viewBox attribute is not properly handled;
  • OpenOffice still has the problem with translation but for the rest seems fine;
  • Safari still has the same problems;
  • Opera 9.6 on Windows finally renders it perfectly, but fails under Ubuntu (?!);
  • Firefox official builds for Windows and OSX, as well as under Ubuntu, work fine; under Gentoo, it does not, and still show the rectangles;
  • Adobe SVG plugin work fine.

At this point I should have enough working implementations so that I can proceed with my job task, but this actually made me think about the whole thing about SVG, and it reminded me tremendously of the OASIS OpenDocument smoke which I had a fight with more than three years ago. I like very much XML-based technologies for sake of interoperation, but it’d be nice if the implementations actually had a way to produce a proper result.

Like in OpenDocument, where the specifications allow two different styles for lists, and different software implements just one of them, making themselves incompatible one with the other, SVG defines some particular features that are not really understood or used by some implementations, or can create compatibility issues between implementations.

In this case, it seems like my problem is the way I use SVG subdocuments to establish new viewports, and then use the viewBox feature to change their unit space. This is perfectly acceptable and well described by the specifics, but it seems to cause further issues down the line with the measure units inside and outside these subdocuments. But it seems like the problem is not just one-way, from this other bugreport on Inkscape you can also see that Inkscape does not generate so pure SVG as it should.

While XML has been properly designed to be extensible, thanks to things like namespaces and similar, one would expect that the feature provided by a given format would be used before creating your own extensions; in this case from that bug report you can see (and I indeed double checked that it still is the case) that Inkscape does not use SVG’s own features to establish a correspondence between “SVG pixels” and the size in real-world units of the image; indeed, it adds two new attributes to the main document: inkscape:export-xdpi and inkscape:export-ydpi, while SVG expects you to use the viewBox for providing that information.

Sigh, I just wished to get my graph working.

3 thoughts on “Inconsistent Scalable Vector Graphics

  1. No comment on the SVG, but on the nxml — people tend to pick up stuff once it’s left on the floor unmaintained, but not to do any additional work to something that’s working perfectly well and kept up to date by someone else, even if that someone is complaining.

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  2. Thanks Erik, that’s useful to know for me, I’ll tell that to my colleague who tried it for me to double check _what_ he tried ;)

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