Unnecessary, but required

In the past year, I’ve hard to learn quite a few different lessons, some harder than others, some more gratifying than others. One of the main (but far from the only) source of these lessons was learning to live with someone else — save for my mother, and a few months with Luca, I have never really shared an apartment, a flat, or a house with someone else for more than a few days. But now that I’m happily married, there’s no going back to solitude. And it’s a feeling I’m really happy about, despite the eventual challenges that this has brought to both of us.

One of the differences that we realised early on is that we have different tolerances to chaos and trinkets. I’m not particularly organised when it comes to sorting out my stuff, but I’m also not a total slob — but I don’t mind having items spread across three rooms, and I was not particularly well known for having ironed t-shirts. My wife’s much less… chaotic, but at the same time has a fairly short patience for technology for the sake of technology.

This pretty much makes a dent in the amount of random gadgets I end up buying for the sake of trying out, because they might just end up not being used, or even not being welcome if they somehow get in the way. I think my most impressive achievement has been making her accept we have an electric cheese grater. I’m still trying to convince her it’s a good idea for me to disassemble the battery charger to replace the current plug-in adapter with an micro-USB port. Which is honestly not necessary at all: the plug is an AC-DC adapter, europlug with one of those europlug-to-british screw-in adapters, which means if we decide to leave London for the Continent, we won’t be needing to replace it — it would only become an issue if we moved to a different part of the world, and we can address it then.

But at the same time, this is the type of modification that in my eyes is… well, required. Why would I not make my electric cheese grater into an USB-powered electric cheese grater?

This reminded me of what Adam Savage (of Mythbuster fame) says in his biography Every Tool’s A Hammer (which, incidentally, is an awesome read that I would recommend everyone who has even a passing interest in creating stuff):

I often describe myself as a serial skill collector. I’ve had so many different jobs over my lifetime […] that my virtual tool chest is overflowing. Still I love learning new ways of thinking and organizing, new technqiues, new ways of solving old problems. […] The skills I have, all of them, are simply arrows in my mental quiver, tools in my problem-solving tool chest, to achieve that thing. […] And I learned each of them specifically for that reason. […] Eventually, […] I came to realise this was the ONLY way I could successfully learn a skill—by doing something with it, by applying it in my real world.

Adam Savage, Every Tool’s A Hammer

This is pretty much my life. I have pretty clearly failed at learning things “academically”, lasting only a few weeks at University of Venice, and instead building up my knowledge by working on different projects, both opensource and for customers, and by trying things out for myself. This has been a blessing and a curse at same time: while it meant that I have been collecting a bunch of skills, just like Adam is saying above, for the most part I have superficial skills: I’ve only rarely had to go deep-dive into a technology or a problem in my dayjob, and the amount of time I have to spend on side projects has been fairly low, and shrinking.

Long are the the days gone when I could sit down to write a stupid IRC bot in Qt, just because I could, and not just for the lack of time. It’s also because, for the most part, I keep telling myself it’s a bad idea to work on something low level, when someone else already did it better than I could possibly do — which is likely true, but it fails to meet my requirement to add the skill to my repertoire. And that’s by itself a career-limiting move, comparable to to the bubble problem.

With these issues in mind, I’m definitely glad my wife is understanding on why I sometimes spend money, time, effort (or most likely, all three) just to get something done because I want to, and not because there’s much need for it. It’s unnecessary, but required for me to keep up to scratch. And being able to do that, without upsetting my partner despite the chaos it creates, is a significant privilege.

As well as privilege is being able to afford the time, space, and money for all these projects. I think this is, for the most part, something that is not quite clear out there yet: being able to contribute to opensource, to write up tips and tricks, to document how to do things are privileges. And I think it’s important to share this privilege, even in form of tips, tricks, videos, and blogs — which is why this blog is still existing, and even with ever-shortening spare time I try to write updates.

Whether it is Bigclive on YouTube, with sometimes off-colour comments that make me uncomfortable, or Adam Savage’s own Tested, that can rely on a real, professional shop, or Micah’s most awesome electronics reverse engineering channel, or Foone’s Twitter feed, I am very glad for those who do their best to share knowledge — and I don’t really need to know why they are doing it. Even when it doesn’t really help me directly (because I can’t learn something if I don’t try myself), I know it can help someone else. Or inspire someone else (or in some cases, me) to go and try something, that will make them learn more.

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