Beurer GL50, Linux and Debug Interfaces

In the previous post when I reviewed the Beurer GL50, I have said that on Windows this appears as a CD-Rom with the installer and portable software to use to download the data off it. This is actually quite handy for the users, but of course leaves behind users of Linux and macOS — except of course if you wanted to use the Bluetooth interface.

I did note that on Linux, the whole device does not work correctly. Indeed, when you connect this to a modern Linux kernel, it’ll fail to mount at all. But because of the way udev senses a new CD-Rom being inserted, it also causes an infinite loop in the userspace, making udev use most of a single core for hours and hours, trying to process CD in, CD out events.

When I noticed it I thought it would be a problem in the USB Mass Storage implementation, but at the end of the day the problem turned out to be one layer below that and be a problem in the SCSI command implementation instead. Because yes, of course USB Mass Storage virtual CD-Rom devices still mostly point at SCSI implementations below.

To provide enough context, and to remind myself how I went around this if I ever forget, the Beurer device appears to use a virtual CD-Rom interface on a chip developed by either Cygnal or Silicon Labs (the latter bought the former in 2003). I only know the Product ID of the device as 0x85ED, but I failed trying to track down the SiliconLabs model to figure out why and how.

To find may way around the Linux kernel, and try to get the device to connect at all, I ended up taking a page off marcan’s book, and used the qemu’s ability to launch a Linux kernel directly, with a minimum initramfs that only contains the minimum amount of files. In my case, I used the busybox-static binary that came with OpenSuse as the base, since I didn’t need any particular reproduction case beside trying to mount the device.

The next problem was figuring out how to get the right debug information. At first I needed to inspect at least four separate parts of the kernel: USB Mass Storage, the Uniform (sic) CD-Rom driver, the SCSI layer, and the ISO9660 filesystem support — none of those seemed a clear culprit at the very beginning, so debugging time it was. Each of those appear to have separate ideas of how to do debugging at all, at least up to version 5.3 which is the one I’ve been hacking on.

The USB Mass Storage layer has its own configuration option (CONFIG_USB_STORAGE_DEBUG), and once enabled in the kernel config, a ton of information on the USB Mass Storage is output on the kernel console. SCSI comes with its own logging support (CONFIG_SCSI_LOGGING) but as I found a few days of hacking later, you also need to enable it within /proc/sys/dev/scsi/logging_level, and to do so you need to calculate an annoying bitmask — thankfully there’s a tool in sg3_utils called scsi_logging_level… but it says a lot that it’s needed, in my opinion. The block layer in turn has its own CONFIG_BLK_DEBUG_FS option, but I didn’t even manage to look at how that’s configured.

The SCSI CD driver (sr), has a few debug outputs that need to be enabled by removing manual #if conditions in the code, while the cdrom driver comes with its own log level configuration, a module parameter to enable the logging, and overall a complicated set of debug knobs. And just enabling them is not useful — at some point the debug output in the cdrom driver was migrated to the modern dynamic debug support, which means you need to enable the debugging specifically for the driver, and then you need to enable the dynamic debug. I sent a patch to just remove the driver-specific knobs.

Funnily enough, when I sent the first version of the patch, I was told about the ftrace interface, which turned out to be perfect to continue sorting out the calls that I needed to tweak. This turned into another patch, that removes all the debug output that is redundant with ftrace.

So after all of this, what was the problem? Well, there’s a patch for that, too. The chip used by this meter does not actually include all the MMC commands, or all of the audio CD command. Some of those missing features are okay, and an error returned from the device will be properly ignored. Others cause further SCSI commands to fail, and that’s why I ended up having to implement vendor-specific support to mask away quite a few features — and gate usage in a few functions. It appears to me that as CD-Rom, CD-RW, and DVDs became more standard, the driver stopped properly gating feature usage.

Well, I don’t have more details of what I did to share, beside what is already in the patches. But I think if there’s a lesson here, is that if you want to sink your teeth into the Linux kernel’s code, you can definitely take a peek at a random old driver, and figure out if it was over-engineered in a past that did not come with nice trimmings such as ftrace, or dynamic debug support, or generally the idea that the kernel is one big common project.

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