On Android Launchers

Usual disclaimer, that what I’m writing about is my own opinions, and not those of my employer, and so on.

I have a relationship that is probably best described as love/hate/hate with Android launchers, from the first Android phone I used — the Motorola Milestone, the European version of the Droid. I have been migrating to new launcher apps every year of two, sometimes because I got a new launcher with the firmware (I installed an unofficial CyanogenMod port on the Milestone at some point), or with a new phone (the HTC Desire HD at some point, which also got flashed with CyanogenMod), or simply because I got annoyed with one and try a different one.

I remember for a while I was actually very happy with HTC’s “skin”, which included the launcher, which came with beautiful alpha-blended widgets (a novelty at the time), but I replaced it with, I think, ADW Launcher (the version from the Android Market – what is now the Play Store – not what was on CyanogenMod at that point). I think this was the time when the system apps could not be upgraded via the Store/Market distribution. To make the transition smoother I even ended up looking for widget apps, including a couple of “pro” versions, but at the end of the day grew tired of those as well.

At some point, I think upon suggestion from a colleague, I jumped onto the Aviate launcher, which was unfortunately later bought by Yahoo!. As you can imagine, Yahoo!’s touch was not going to improve the launcher at all, to the point that one day I got annoyed enough I started looking into something else.

Of all the launchers, Aviate is probably the one that looked the most advanced, and I think it’s still one of the most interesting ideas: it had “contextual” pages, with configurable shortcuts and widgets, that could be triggered by time-of-day, or by location. This included the ability, for instance, to identify when you were in a restaurant and show FourSquare and TripAdvisor as the shortcuts.

I would love to have that feature again. Probably even more so now, as the apps I use are even more modal: some of them I only use at home (such as, well, Google Home, the Kodi remote, or Netflix), some of them nearly only on the go (Caffe Nero, Costa, Google Pay, …). Or maybe what I want is Google Now, which does not exist anymore, but let’s ignore that for now.

The other feature that I really liked about Aviate was that it introduced me to the feature that I’ll call jump-to-letter: the Aviate “app drawer” kept apps organised by letter, separated. Which meant you could just tap on the right border of your phone, and you would jump to the right letter. And having the ability to just go to N to open Netflix is pretty handy. Particularly when icons are all mostly the same except for maybe colour.

So when I migrated away from Aviate, I looked for another launcher with a similar jump-to-letter feature, and I ended up finding Action Launcher 3. This is probably the launcher I used the longest; I bought the yearly supporter IAP multiple times because I thought it deserved it.

I liked the idea of backporting the feature of what was originally the Google Now Launcher – nowadays known as the Pixel Launcher – that would allow using the new features announced by Google for their own phones on other phones already on the market. At some point, though, it started pushing the idea of sideloading an APK so that the launcher could also backport the actual Google Now page — it made me very wary and never installed it, it would have needed too many permissions. But it became too pushy when it started updating every week, replacing my default home page with its own widgets. That was too much.

At that point I looked around and found Microsoft Launcher, which was (and is) actually pretty good. While it includes integration for Microsoft services such as Cortana, they kept all the integration optional, so I did set it up with all the features disabled, and kept the stylish launcher instead. With jump-to-letter, and Bing’s lovely daily wallpapers, which are terrific, particularly when they are topical.

It was fairly lightweight, while having useful features, including the ability to hide apps from the drawer, including those that can’t be uninstalled from the phone, or that have an app icon for no reason, such as SwiftKey and Gboard, or many “Pro” license key apps that only launch the primary app.

Unfortunately last month something started going wrong, either because of a beta release or something else, and the Launcher started annoying me. Sometimes I would tap the Home button, and the Launcher would show up with no icons and no dock, the only thing I could do was to go to the Apps settings and force stop it. It also started failing to draw the AIX Weather Widget, which is the only widget I usually have on my personal phone (the work phone has the Calendar on it). I gave up, despite one of the Microsoft folks contacting me on Twitter asking for further details so that they can track down the issues.

I decided to reconsider the previous launchers I used, but I skipped over both Action Launcher (too soon to reconsider I guess) and Aviate (given the current news between Flickr and Tumblr, I’m not sure I trust them — and I didn’t even check to make sure it still is maintained). Instead I went for Nova Launcher, which I used before. It seems to be fairly straightforward, although it lacks the jump-to-letter feature. It worked well enough when I installed it, and it’s very responsive. So I went for that for now. I might reconsider more of them later.

One thing that I noticed, that all three of Action Launcher, Microsoft Launcher, and Nova Launcher do, is to allow you to back up your launcher configuration. But none of them do it through the normal Android backup system, like WhatsApp or Viber. Instead they let you export a configuration file you can reload. I guess it might be so you can copy your home screen from one phone to the other, but… I don’t know, I find it strange.

In any case, if you have suggestions for the best Android launcher, I’m happy to hear them. I’m not set on my way with Nova Launcher, and I’m happy to pay a reasonable amount (up to £10 I would say) for a “Pro” launcher, because I know it’s not cheap to build them. And if any of you know of any “modal” launcher that would allow me to change the primary home screen depending on whether I’m home or not (I don’t particularly need the detail that Aviate used to provide), I would be particularly happy.

One thought on “On Android Launchers

  1. I tried a lightweight third-party launcher on my old Nexus 5X after Google discontinued their own default Now launcher.

    I was surprised to learn how much faster the device became and how much RAM it freed up. Changing launchers extended the device’s lifetime by six months. I just stupidly assumed the default launcher provided by Google would be the beat option.

    I’ve got a new phone now, the Nokia 7 Plus, and use the default launcher once again. This device has twice the RAM, though. I don’t need the launcher to be as lightweight anymore.

    Ps: Exporting to a file is the best option for backup on Android. You can’t install third-party backup providers for the built-in backup system unless you root your phone. So you’re stuck with backing up to Google Drive (if your device even have g’apps) or nothing.

    Liked by 1 person

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