Diabetes Software: the importance of documented protocols

You may remember that just last week I was excited to announce that I had more work planned and lined up for my glucometer utilities, one of which was supporting OneTouch Verio IQ which is a slightly older meter that is still sold and in use in many countries, but for which no protocol is released.

In the issue I linked above you can find an interesting problem: LifeScan discontinued their Diabetes Management Software, and removed it from their website. Indeed instead they suggest you get one of their Bluetooth meters and to use that with their software. While in general the idea of upgrading a meter is sane, the fact that they decided to discontinue the old software without providing protocols is at the very least annoying.

This shows the importance of having open source tools that can be kept alive as long as needed, because there will be people out there that still rely on their OneTouch Verio IQ, or even on the OneTouch Ultra Easy, which was served by the same software, and is still being sold in the US. Luckily at least they at least used to publish the Ultra Easy protocol specs and they are still available on the Internet at large if you search for them (and I do have a copy, and I can rephrase that into a protocol specification if I find that’s needed).

On the bright side, the Tidepool project (of which I wrote before) has a driver for the Verio IQ. It’s not a particularly good driver, as I found out (I’ll get to that later), but it’s a starting point. It made me notice that the protocol was almost an in-between of the Ultra Easy and the Verio 2015, which I already reverse engineered before.

Of course I also managed to find a copy of the LifeScan software on a mostly shady website and a copy of the “cable drivers” package from the Middle East and Africa website of LifeScan, which still has the website design from five years ago. This is good because the latter package is the one that installs kernel drivers on Windows, while the former only contains userland software, which I can trust a little more.

Comparing the USB trace I got from the software with the commands implemented in the TidePool driver showed me a few interesting bits of information. The first being the first byte of commands on the Verio devices is not actually fixed, but can be chosen between a few, as the Windows software and the TidePool driver used different bytes (and with this I managed to simplify one corner case in the Verio 2015!). The second is that the TidePool driver does not extract all the information it should! In particular the device allows before/after meal marking, but they discard the byte before getting to it. Of course they don’t seem to expose that data even from the Ultra 2 driver so it may be intentional.

A bit more concerning is that they don’t verify that the command returned a success status, but rather discard the first two bytes every time. Thankfully it’s very easy for me to check that.

On the other hand, reading through the TidePool driver (which I have to assume was developed with access to the LifeScan specifications, under NDA) I could identify two flaws in my own code. The first was not realizing the packet format between the UltraEasy and the Verio 2015 was not subtly different as I thought, but it was almost identical, except the link-control byte in both Verio models is not used, and is kept to 0. The second was that I’m not currently correctly dropping out control solutions from the readings of the Verio 2015! I should find a way to get a hold of the control solution for my models in the pharmacy and make sure I get this tested out.

Oh yeah, and the TidePool driver does not do anything to get or set date and time; thankfully the commands were literally the same as in the Verio 2015, so that part was an actual copy-paste of code. I should probably tidy up a bit, but now I would have a two-tier protocol system: the base packet structure is shared between the UltraEasy, Verio IQ and Verio 2015. Some of the commands are shared between UltraEasy and Verio IQ, more of them are shared between the Verio IQ and the Verio 2015.

You can see now why I’ve been disheartened to hear that the development of drivers, even for open source software, is done through closed protocol specifications that cannot be published (or the drivers thoroughly commented). Since TidePool is not actually using all of the information, there is no way to tell what certain bytes of the responses represent. And unless I get access to all the possible variants of the information, I can’t tell how some bytes that to me look like constant should represent. Indeed since the Verio 2015 does not have meal information, I assumed that the values were 32-bit until I got a report of invalid data on another model which shares the same protocol and driver. This is why I am tempted to build “virtual” fakes of these devices with Facedencer to feed variants of the data to the original software and see how it’s represented there.

On the bright side I feel proud of myself (maybe a little too much) for having spent the time to rewrite those two drivers with Construct while at 34C3 and afterwards. If I hadn’t refactored the code before looking at the Verio IQ, I wouldn’t have noticed the similarities so clearly and likely wouldn’t have come to the conclusion it’s a shared similar protocol. And no way I could have copy-pasted between the drivers so easily as I did.

One thought on “Diabetes Software: the importance of documented protocols

  1. This sounds great. I found your website by accident as I am looking at Ghost/Hugo and then found out you are workign on Diabtes software. Diabetes is my main architecture project at work – I’d be interested to have a chat to you.

    Like

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