IPv6: WordPress has a long way to go, too

I recently complained about Hugo and the fact that it seems like its development was taken over by SEO-types, that changed its defaults to something I’m not comfortable with. In the comments to that post I have let it understood that I’ve been looking into WordPress as an alternative once again.

The reason why I’m looking into WordPress is that I expected it to be a much easier setup, and (assuming I don’t go crazy on the plugins) an easily upgradeable install. Jürgen told me that they now support Markdown, and of course moving to WordPress means I don’t need to keep using Disqus for comments, and I can own my comments again.

The main problem with WordPress, like most PHP apps, is that it requires particular care for it to be set up securely and safely. Luckily I do have some experience with this kind of work, and I thought I might as well share my experience and my setup once I got it running. But here is where things got complicated, to the point I’m not sure if I have any chance of getting this working, so I may have to stick with Hugo for much longer than I was hoping. And almost all of the problems fall back to the issue that my battery of test servers are IPv6-only. But don’t let me get ahead of myself.

After installing, configuring, and getting MySQL, Apache, and PHP-FPM to all work together nicely (which believe me was not obvious), I tried to set up the Akismet plugin, which failed. I ignored that, removed it, and then figured out that there is no setting to enable Markdown at all. Turns out it requires a plugin, which, according again to Jürgen, is the Jetpack plugin from WordPress.com itself.

Unfortunately, I couldn’t get the plugins page to work at all: it would just return an error connecting to WordPress.org. The first problem was that the Plugins page wouldn’t load at all, and a quick tcpdump later told me that WordPress tried connecting to api.wordpress.org. Which despite having eight separate IP addresses to respond from, has no IPv6. Well, that’s okay, I have a TinyProxy running on the host system that I use to fetch distfiles from the “outside world” that is not v6-compatible, so I just need to set this up, right? After all, I was already planning on disallowing direct network access to WordPress, so that’s not a big deal.

Well, the first problem is that the way to set up proxies with WordPress is not documented in the default wp-config.php file. Luckily I found that someone else wrote it down. And that started me on the right direction. Except it was not enough, as the list of plugins and the search page would come up, but they wouldn’t download, with the same error about not being able to establish a (secure) connection to WordPress.org, but only on the Apache error log at first — the page itself would have a debug trace if you ask WP to enable debug reporting.

Quite a bit of debugging later, with tcpdump and editing the source code, I found the problem: some of the requests sent by WordPress target HTTP endpoints, and others (including the downloads, correctly) target HTTPS endpoints. The HTTP endpoints worked fine, but the HTTPS ones failed. And the reason why they failed is that they tried to connect to TinyProxy with TLS. TinyProxy does not support TLS, because it really just performs the minimal amount of work needed of a proxy. And for what it’s worth, in my setup it only allows local connections, so there is no real value in adding TLS to it.

Turns out this bug is only present if PHP does not have curl support, and WordPress fallback to fsockopen. Enabling the curl USE flag for the ebuild was enough to fix the problem, and I reported the bug. I honestly wonder if the Gentoo ebuild should actually force curl on, for WordPress, but I don’t want to go there yet.

By the way, I originally didn’t want to say this on this blog post, but since it effectively went viral, I also found out at that point that the reason why I could get a list of plugins, is that when the connection to api.wordpress.org with HTTPS fails, the code retries explicitly with HTTP. It’s effectively a silent connection downgrade (you’d still find the warning in the log, but nothing would appear like breaking at first). This appears to include the “new version check” of WordPress, which makes it an interesting security issue. I reported it via WordPress Hacker One page before my tweet got viral — and sorry, I didn’t at first realize just how bad that downgrade was.

So now I have an installation of WordPress, mostly secure, able to look for, fetch and install plugins. Let me install JetPack to get that famous Markdown support that is to me a requirement and dealbreaker. For some reason (read: because WordPress is more Open Core than Open Source), it requires activating with a WordPress.com account. That should be easy, yes?

Error Details: The Jetpack server was unable to communicate with your site https://%5BOMISSIS%5D [IXR -32300: transport error: http_request_failed cURL error 7: ]

I hid away the URL for my test server, simply to avoid spammers. The website is public, and it has a valid certificate (thank you Let’s Encrypt), and it is not firewalled or requiring any particular IP to connect to. But, IPv6 only. Which makes it easy for me, as it reduces the amount of scanners and spammers while I try it out, and since I have an IPv6-enabled connection at both home and the office, it makes it easy to test with.

Unfortunately it seems like the WordPress infrastructure not only is not reachable from the IPv6 Internet, but it does not even egress onto it either. Which makes once again the myth of IPv6-only networks infeasible. Contacting WordPress.com on Twitter ended up with them opening a support ticket for me, and a few exchanges and logs later, they confirmed their infrastructure does not support IPv6 and, as they said, «[they] don’t have an estimate on when [they] may».

Where does this leave me? Well, right now I can’t activate the normal Jetpack plugin, but they have a “development version”, which they assert is fully functional for Markdown, and that should let me keep evaluating WordPress without this particular hurdle. Of course this requires more time, and may end up with me hitting other roadblock at this point, I’m not sure. So we’ll see.

Whether I’ll get it to work or not, I will share my configuration files in the near future, because it took me a while to get them set up properly, and some of them are not really explained. You may end up seeing a new restyle of the blog in the next few months. It’s going to bother me a bit, because I usually prefer to kepe the blog the same way for years, instead, but I guess that needs to happen this time around. Also, changing the posts’ paths again means I’ll have to set up another chain of redirects. If I do that, I have a bit of a plan to change the hostname of the blog too.

7 thoughts on “IPv6: WordPress has a long way to go, too

  1. Automattic doesn’t test Jetpack in IPv6 environments so they keep breaking IPv6 support every few months. Earlier this year they shipped a bad “find the port number by splitting addresses at the first colonbug. The bug would block whole /8 address spaces in one go, effectively blocking all of IPv6 space pretty darned fast.I don’t like Jetpack because of the constant nagging messages about upgrading to a paid plan. However, I rely on it to push blog updates to social networks and a few other little things that are not provided in WordPress Core.I’ve also gotten no clear answers from Automattic’s happiness engineers (support staff) regarding the privacy policy of Askimet and other services where Jetpack pushes data submitted by your users off your server and over to Automattic for processing (and storage? how is it used? how long is it stored? EU GDPR compliant?).

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  2. I’m not sure what you expect me to do with that Kickstarter. I know flask, better than I would have liked to be honest. But it’s a framework and I have zero intention of building my own webapp for either the blog or the comments. It’s a waste of my time, energy and will to continue writing altogether.

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  3. There are a few plugins for markdown. You do not need akismet there are other options. If you want to chat via whatsapp or zoom to work through some of these issues I would be happy to help. I also have a US number if that helps.

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  4. I switched to ip6 for local development on osx because osx has or had such terrible dns resolving that if the page finished at all it took far too long. Fast forward a few years and it seems like wordpWordno longer works locally with ip6. Login, listing posts, plugins take minutes to resolve if they even complete. I also get a number of ssl errors from their site that doesn’t help.

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  5. I switched to ip6 for local development on osx because osx has or had such terrible dns resolving that if the page finished at all it took far too long. Fast forward a few years and it seems like wordpWordno longer works locally with ip6. Login, listing posts, plugins take minutes to resolve if they even complete. I also get a number of ssl errors from their site that doesn’t help.

    Like

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