Free Idea: a QEMU Facedancer fuzzer

This post is part of a series of free ideas that I’m posting on my blog in the hope that someone with more time can implement. It’s effectively a very sketched proposal that comes with no design attached, but if you have time you would like to spend learning something new, but no idea what to do, it may be a good fit for you.

Update (2017-06-19): see last paragraph.

You may already be familiar with the Facedancer, the USB fuzzer originally designed and developed by Travis Goodspeed of PoC||GTFO fame. If you’re not, in no so many words, it’s a board (and framework) that allows you to simulate the behaviour of any USB device. It works thanks to a Python framework which supports a few other board and could – theoretically – be expanded to support any device with gadgetfs support (such as the BeagleBone Black I have at home, but I digress).

I have found about this through Micah’s videos, and I have been thinking for a while to spend some time to do the extension to gadgetfs so I can use it to simulate glucometers with their original software — as in particular it should allow me to figure out which value represent what, by changing what is reported to the software and see how it behaves. While I have had no time to do that yet, this is anyway a topic for a different post.

The free idea I want to give instead is to integrate, somehow, the Facedancer framework with QEMU, so that you can run the code behind a Facedancer device as if it was connected to a QEMU guest, without having to use any hardware at all. A “Virtualdancer”, which would not only obviate the need for hardware in the development phase (if the proof of concept of a facedancer were to require an off-site usage) but also would integrate more easily into fuzzing projects such as Bochspwn or TriforceAFL.

In particular, I have interest not only in writing simulated glucometers for debugging purposes (although a testsuite that requires qemu and a simulated device may be a bit overkill), but also in simulating HID devices. You may remember that recently I had to fix my ELECOM trackball, and this is not the first time I have to deal with broken HID descriptor. I have spent some more time looking into the Linux HID subsystem and I’m trying to figure out if I can make some simplifications here and there (again, topic for another time), so having a way to simulate an HID device with strange behaviour and see if my changes fix it or not would be extremely beneficial.

Speaking of HID, and report descriptors in particular, Alex Ionescu (of ReactOS fame) at REcon pointed out that there appear to be very few reported security issues with HID report descriptor parsing, in particular for Windows, which seems strange given how parsing those descriptor is very hard, and in particular there are very seriously broken descriptors out there. This would be another very interesting surface for a QEMU-based dancer software, to run through a number of broken HID report descriptor and send data to see how the system behaves. I would be very surprised if there is no bug in particular on the many small and random drives that apply workarounds such as the one I did for ELECOM.

Anyway, as I said I haven’t even had time to make the (probably minor) modifications to the framework to support BBB (which I already have access to), so you can imagine I’m not going to be working on this any time soon, but if you feel like working on some USB code, why not?

Update (2017-07-19): I pointed Travis at this post over Twitter, and he showed me vUSBf. While this does not have the same interface as facedancer, it proves that there is a chance to provide a virtual USB device implemented in Python.

As a follow up, Binyamin Sharet linked to Umap2 which supports fuzzing on top of facedancer, but does not support qemu as it is.

While it’s not quite (yet) what I had in mind, it proves that it is a feasible goal, and that there is already some code out there getting very close!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s