Gentoo Linux Health Report — October 2012 Edition

I guess it’s time for a new post on what’s the status with Gentoo Linux right now. First of all, the tinderbox is munching as I write. Things are going mostly smooth but there are still hiccups due to some developers not accepting its bug reports because of the way logs are linked (as in, not attached).

Like last time that I wrote about it, four months ago, this is targeting GCC 4.7, GLIBC 2.16 (which is coming out of masking next week!) and GnuTLS 3. Unfortunately, there are a few (biggish) problems with this situation, mostly related to the Boost problem I noted back in July.

What happens is this:

  • you can’t use any version of boost older than 1.48 with GCC 4.7 or later;
  • you can’t use any version of boost older than 1.50 with GLIBC 2.16;
  • many packages don’t build properly with boost 1.50 and later;
  • a handful of packages require boost 1.46;
  • boost 1.50-r2 and later (in Gentoo) no longer support eselect boost making most of the packages using boost not build at all.

This kind of screwup is a major setback, especially since Mike (understandably) won’t wait any more to unmask GLIBC 2.16 (he waited a month, the Boost maintainers had all the time to fix their act, which they didn’t — it’s now time somebody with common sense takes over). So the plan right now is for me and Tomáš to pick up the can of worms, and un-slot Boost, quite soon. This is going to solve enough problems that we’ll all be very happy about it, as most of the automated checks for Boost will then work out of the box. It’s also going to reduce the disk space being used by your install, although it might require you to rebuild some C++ packages, I’m sorry about that.

For what concerns GnuTLS, version 3.1.3 is going to hit unstable users at the same time as glibc-2.16, and hopefully the same will be true for stable when that happens. Unfortunately there are still a number of packages not fixed to work with gnutls, so if you see a package you use (with GnuTLS) in the tracker it’s time to jump on fixing it!

Speaking of GnuTLS, we’ve also had a smallish screwup this morning when libtasn1 version 3 also hit the tree unmasked — it wasn’t supposed to happen, and it’s now masked, as only GnuTLS 3 builds fine with it. Since upstream really doesn’t care about GnuTLS 2 at this point, I’m not interested in trying to get that to work nicely, and since I don’t see any urgency in pushing libtasn1 v3 as is, I’ll keep it masked until GNOME 3.6 (as gnome-keyring also does not build with that version, yet).

Markos has correctly noted that the QA team – i.e., me – is not maintaining the DevManual anymore. We made it now a separate project, under QA (but I’d rather say it’s shared under QA and Recruiters at the same time), and the GIT Repository is now writable by any developer. Of course if you play around that without knowing what you’re doing, on master, you’ll be terminated.

There’s also the need to convert the DevManual to something that makes sense. Right now it’s a bunch of files all called text.xml which makes editing a nightmare. I did start working on that two years ago but it’s tedious work and I don’t want to do it on my free time. I’d rather not have to do it while being paid for it really. If somebody feels like they can handle the conversion, I’d actually consider paying somebody to do that job. How much? I’d say around $50. Desirable format is something that doesn’t make a person feel like taking their eyes out when trying to edit it with Emacs (and vim, if you feel generous): my branch used DocBook 5, which I rather fancy, as I’ve used it for Autotools Mythbuster but RST or Sphinx would probably be okay as well, as long as no formatting is lost along the way. Update: Ben points out he already volunteered to convert it to RST, I’ll wait for that before saying anything more.

Also, we’re looking for a new maintainer for ICU (and I’m pressing Davide to take the spot) as things like the bump to 50 should have been handled more carefully. Especially now that it appears that it’s basically breaking a quarter of its dependencies when using GCC 4.7 — both the API and ABI of the library change entirely depending on whether you’re using GCC 4.6 or 4.7, as it’ll leverage C++11 support in the latter. I’m afraid this is just going to be the first of a series of libraries making this kind of changes and we’re all going to suffer through it.

I guess this is all for now.

4 thoughts on “Gentoo Linux Health Report — October 2012 Edition

  1. On the ML I already offered to convert the devmanual to rst. As soon as I have another block of free time (maybe this weekend) I will look into this and see what it takes to make a sane conversion.

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  2. In the DevManual paragraph the sentence ends abruptly: ‘my branch used DocBook 5, which I’.

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  3. Between the ICU-50_rc and GnuTLS by system has been more unusable than normal latelyAre there any lessons learned – measures we can put in place – to prevent these kind of breakages happening again?I’ve currently got icu-50_rc-r1 masked too as it still doesn’t compile with Chromium – which is one of the few packages I care about working

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  4. @Mike:actually we already have policies that should prevent this. The problem is, specially with icu, that nobody cared about them.There is for example policy that when bumping library you are supposed to check its runtime dependencies and mask if it breaks a lot of packages, etc etc…For boost, it was broken for some time already, so basically we are just returing to the state it works at least a bit.

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