Bad branching, or a Quagga call for help

You might remember that for a while I worked on getting quagga in shape in Gentoo. The reason why I was doing that is that I needed quagga for the ADSL PCI modem I was using at home to work. Since right now I’m on the other side of the world, and my router decided to die, I’m probably going to stop maintaining Quagga altogether.

There are other reasons to be, which is probably why for a while we had a Quagga ebuild with invalid copyright headers (it was a contribution of somebody working somewhere, but over time it has been rewritten to the point it didn’t really made sense not to use our standard copyright header). From one side it’s the bad state of the documentation, which makes it very difficult to understand how to set up even the most obvious of the situations, but the main issue is the problem with the way the Quagga project is branching around.

So let’s take a step back and see one thing about Quagga: when I picked it up, there were two or three external patches configured by USE flags; these are usually very old and they are not included in the main Quagga sources. It’s not minimal patches either but they introduce major new functionality, and they are very intrusive (which is why they are not simply always included). This is probably due to the fact that Quagga is designed to be the routing daemon for Linux, with a number of possible protocol frontends connecting to the same backend (zebra). Over time instead of self-contained, easily out-of-date patches to implement new protocols, we started having whole new repositories (or at least branches) with said functionalities, thanks to the move to GIT, which makes it too easy to fork even if that’s not always a bad thing.

So now you get all these repositories with extra implementations, not all of which are compatible with one another, and most of which are not supported by upstream. Is that enough trouble? Not really. As I said before, Paul Jakma who’s the main developer of the project is of the idea that he doesn’t need a “stable” release, so he only makes release when he cares, and maintained that it’s the vendors’ task to maintain backports. On that spirit, some people started the Release Engineering for Quagga, but ….

When you think about a “Release Engineering” branch, you think of something akin to Greg’s stable kernel releases, so you get the latest version, and then you patch over it to make sure that it works fine, backporting the new features and fixes that hit master. Instead what happens here is that Quagga-RE forked off version 0.99.17 (we’re now to 0.99.21 on main, although Gentoo is still on .20 since I really can’t be bothered), and they are applying patches over that.

Okay so that’s still something, you get the backports from master on a known good revision is a good idea, isn’t it? Yes it would be a good idea if it wasn’t that … it’s actually new features applied over the old version! If you check you see that they have implemented a number of features in the RE branch which are not in master… to the result that you have a master that is neither a super-set nor a sub-set of the RE branch.

Add to this that some of the contributors of new code seems to have not clear what a license is and they cause discussion on the mailing list on the interpretation of the code’s license, and you can probably see why I don’t care about keeping this running, given I’m not using it in production anywhere.

Beforehand I was still caring about this knowing that Alin was using it, and he was co-maintaining it … but now that Alin has been retired, I’d be the sole maintainer of a piece of software that rarely works correctly, and is schizophrenic in its development, so I really don’t have extra time to spend on this.

So to finish this post with a very clear message: if you use Gentoo and rely on Quagga working for production usage, please step up now or it might just break without notice, as nobody’s caring for it! And if a Quagga maintainer reads this, please, please start making sense on your releases, I beg you.

4 thoughts on “Bad branching, or a Quagga call for help

  1. This is not good news, in particular for my case of running VM hosts with routed networking. But I am nowhere near ready to jump in.

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  2. Well… hit and sunk.Yes, I do rely on quagga (or rather, OSPF and occasionally re-exporting the OSPF-generated routes using RIP for legacy systems) in a [small] number of production environments.Unfortunately, in those environments there’s usually just one (affected) Linux system; and those are maintained conservatively; i.e. about one update per year.Under these circumstances, I do not feel qualified to properly maintain quagga in datacenter quality.What probably will happen until there is a better solution is that I’ll finally register a publicly-visibly overlay and maintain a “works well enough for me” ebuild there.Anyone who’s better suited to maintaining an in-tree ebuild is more than welcome to pick up from there.

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  3. I’m using it on a home network, and for some VMs too, and as a radvd replacement, but nothing more complicated. Is there an alternative we can use for basic ripd?

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