OpenSolaris Granularity

If you follow my blog since a long time ago you know I had to fight already a couple of time with Solaris and VirtualBox to get a working Solaris virtual machine to test xine-lib and other sotware on.

I tried again yesterday to get one working, since Innotek was bought by Sun, VirtualBox support for Solaris improved notably, to the point they now have a different network card emulated by default, that works with Solaris (that has been the long-standing problem).

So I was able to install OpenSolaris, and thanks to Project Indiana I was able to check which packages were installed, to remove stuff I don’t need and add what I needed. Unfortunately I think the default granularity is a bit concerning. Compiz on a virtual machine?

The first thing I noticed is that an update of a newly-installed system with the last released media requires to download almost the size of the whole disk in updates, the disk is a simple 650MB CD image, and the updates were over 500MB. I suppose this is to be expected, but at that point, why not pointing to some updated media by default, considering updating is far from being trivial? Somehow I was unable to perform the update properly with the GUI package manager, and I had to use the command-line tools.

Also, removing superfluous packages is not an easy task, since the dependency tracking is not exactly the best out there: it’s not strange for a set of packages not to be removed because some of them are dependencies… of one of them being removed (this usually seems to be due to plugin-ins; even after removing the plugins, it’d still cache the broken dependency and disallow me from removing the packages).

It’s not all here of course, for instance to find the basic development tools in their package manager is a problem of its own; while if you look for “automake” it will find a package named SUNWgnu-automake, if you look for “autoconf” it will find nothing; the package is called SUNWaconf. I still haven’t been able to find pkg-config, although the system installs .pc files just fine.

I guess my best bet would be to remove almost everything out the system from their own package manager and decide to try prefixed-Portage, but I just haven’t had the will to look into that just yet. I hope it would also help with the version of GCC that Sun provides (3.4.3).

I got interested back into Solaris since, after a merge of Firefox 3.0.2, I noticed cowstats throwing up an error on an object file, and following to that, I found out a couple of things:

  • cowstats didn’t manage unknown sections very well;
  • Firefox ships with some testcases for the Google-developed crash handler;
  • one of these testcases is an ELF ET_EXEC file (with .o extension) built for Solaris, that reports a standard SysV ABI (rather than a Sun-specific one), but still contains Sun-specific sections;
  • readelf from Binutils is not that solid as its homologue from Elfutils.

Now cowstats should handle these corner-cases pretty well, but I want to enrich my testcases with some Solaris objects. Interestingly enough, in ruby-elf probably 80% of the size of an eventual tarball would be taken up by test data rather than actual code. I guess this is a side-effect of TDD, but also exactly why TDD-based code is usually more solid (every time I find an error of mine in ruby-elf, I tend to write a test for it).

Anyway, bottom line: I think Project Indiana would have been better by adapting RPM to their needs rather than inventing the package manager they invented, since it doesn’t seem to have any feature lacking in Fedora, but it lacks quite a bit of other things.

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