I’ll stick with Thunderbird still

Even though it hasn’t been an year yet that I moved to KDE, after spending a long time with GNOME 2, XFCE and then Cinnamon, over the past month or so I looked at how much of non-KDE software I could ditch this time around.

The first software I ditched was Pidgin — while the default use of GnuTLS caused some trouble KTP works quite decently. Okay some features are not fully implemented, but the basic chat works, and that’s enough for me — it’s not like I used much more than that on Pidgin either.

Unfortunately, when yesterday I decided to check whether it was possible to ditch Thunderbird for KMail, things didn’t turn out as nice. Yes, the client improved a truckload since what we had at KDE 3 time — but no, it didn’t improve enough for make it usable for me.

The obvious problem zeroth is the dependencies: to install KMail you need to build (but don’t need to enable) the “semantic desktop” — that is, Nepomuk and the content indexing. In particular it brings in Soprano and Virtuoso that have been among the least usable components when KDE4 was launched (at least Strigi is gone with 4.10; we’ll see what the future brings us). So after a night rebuilding part of the system to make sure that the flags are enabled and the packages in place, today I could try KMail.

First problem — at the first run it suggested importing data from Thunderbird — unfortunately it completely stuck there, and after over half an hour it went nowhere. No logs, no diagnostic, just stuck. I decided to ignore it and create the account manually. While KMail tried to find automatically which mail servers to use, it failed badly – I guess it tried to look for some _imap._srv.flameeyes.eu or something, which does not exist – even though Thunderbird can correctly guess that my mail servers are Google’s.

Second problem — the wizard does not make it easy to set up a new identity, which makes it tempting to add the accounts manually, but since you got three different entries that you have to add (Identity, Sending account, Receiving account), adding them in the wrong order gets you to revisit the settings quite a few times. For the curious, the order is sending, identity, receiving.

Third problem — KMail does not implement the Special Folder extension defined in RFC 6154 which GMail makes good use of (it actually implements it both with the standard extension and their own). This means that KMail will store all messages locally (drafts, sent, trash, …) unless you manually set them up. Unlike what somebody have told me, this means that the extension is completely unimplemented, not implemented only partially. I’m not surprised that it’s not implemented, by the way, due to the fact that the folders are declared in two different settings (the identity and the account).

Fourth problem — speaking about GMail, there is no direct way to handle the “archive” action, which is almost a necessity if you want to use it. While this started with GMail and as an almost exclusive to that particular service, nowadays many other services, including standalone software such as Kerio, provide the same workflow; the folder used for archiving is, once again, provided with the special-use notes discussed earlier. Even though the developers do not use GMail themselves, it feels wrong that it’s not implemented.

Fifth problem — while at it, let’s talk a moment about the IDLE command implementation (one of the extensions needed for Push IMAP). As Wikipedia says, KMail implements support for it since version 4.7 — unfortunately, it’s not using it in every case, but only if you disable the “check every X minutes” option — if that is enabled, then the IDLE command is not used. Don’t tell me it’s obvious, because even though it makes sense under some point of views, I wasn’t the only one that was tricked by that. Especially since I read that setting first as “disable if you only want manual check for new mail” — Thunderbird indeed uses IDLE even if you set the scheduled check every few minutes.

Sixth problem — there is no whitelist for remote content on HTML emails. GMail, both web and on the clients, Android and iOS, supports a complete whitelist, separate from everything else. Thunderbird supports a whitelist by adding the sender to the contacts’ list (which is honestly bothersome when adding mailing lists, like in my case). As far as I could tell, there is no way to have such a whitelist on KMail. You either got the protection enabled, or you got it disabled.

The last problem is the trickiest, and it’s hard to tell if it’s a problem at all. When I went to configure the OpenPGP key to use, it wouldn’t show me anything to select at all. I tried for the good part of an hour trying to get it to select my key, and it failed badly. When I installed Kleopatra it worked just fine; on the other hand, Pesa and other devs pointed out that it works for them just fine without Kleopatra installed.

So, what is the resolution at this point, for me? Well, I guess I’ll have to open a few bug feature requests on KDE’s Bugzilla, if I feel like it, and then I might hope for version 4.11 or 4.12 to have something that is more usable than Thunderbird. As it is, that’s not the case.

There are a bunch of minor nuisance and other things that require me to get used to them, such as the (in my view too big) folder icons (even if you change the size of the font, the size of the icon does not change), and the placement of the buttons which required me to get used to it on Thunderbird as well. But these are only minor annoyances.

What I really need for KMail to become my client is a tighter integration with GMail. It might not suit the ideals as much as one might prefer, but it is one of the most used email providers in the world nowadays, and it would go a long way for user friendliness to work nicely with it instead of making it difficult.

HTML5: compliance shouldn’t require support

Seems like the whole thing about HTML5 and video/audio formats is not done yet, three years after my cursing at Quassel due to qt-webkit because Qt-Webkit decided to bring in GStreamer to support HTML5 video.

This time, the issue is with both Firefox and Thunderbird, both of which come with a webm USE flag that, if disabled, make them fail to build.

I start to wonder, why people insist that for HTML5 compliance you have to support viewing the video? All that you got to do is be able to parse the element and act on it; showing a “This content is not available with your current browser” is quite fine, if I don’t want WebM support!

No technical content for today, it’s Sunday and I’m fighting with getting Thunderbird to work.