When (multimedia) fiefdoms crumble

Mike coined the term multimedia fiefdoms recently. He points to a number of different streaming, purchase and rental services for video content (movies, TV series) as the new battleground for users (consumers in this case). There are of course a few more sides in this battle, including music and books, but the idea is still perfectly valid.

What he didn’t get into the details of is what happens one of those fiefdoms capitulates, declaring itself won over, and goes away. It’s not a fun situation to be in, but we actually have plenty of examples of it, and these, more than anything else, should drive the discourse around and against DRM, in my opinion.

For some reasons, the main example of failed fiefdoms is to be found in books, and I lived through (and recounted) a few of those instances. For me personally, it all started four years ago, when I discovered Sony gave up on their LRF format and decided to adopt the “industry standard” ePub by supporting Adobe Digital Editions (ADEPT) DRM scheme on their devices. I was slow on the uptake, the announcement came two years earlier. For Sony, this meant tearing down their walled garden, even though they kept supporting the LRF format and their store for a while – they may even do still, I stopped following two years ago when I moved onto a Kindle – for the user it meant they were now free to buy books from a number of stores, including some publishers, bookstores with online presence and dedicated ebookstores.

But things didn’t always go smoothly: two years later, WHSmith partnered with Kobo, and essentially handed the latter all their online ebook market. When I read the announcement I was actually happy, especially since I could not buy books off WHSmith any more as they started looking for UK billing addresses. Unfortunately it also meant that only a third of the books that I bought from WHSmith were going to be ported over to Kobo due to an extreme cock-up with global rights even to digital books. If I did not go and break the DRM off all my ebooks for the sake of it, I would have lost four books, having to buy them anew again. Given this was not for the seller going bankrupt but for a sell-out of their customers, it was not understandable that they refused to compensate people. Luckily, it did port The Gone-Away World which is one of my favourite books.

Fast forward another year, and the Italian bookstore LaFeltrinelli decided to go the same way, with a major exception: they decided they would keep users on both platforms — that way if you want to buy a digital version of a book you’ll still buy it on the same website, but it’ll be provided by Kobo and in your Kobo library. And it seems like they at least have a better deal regarding books’ rights, as they seemed to have ported over most books anyway. But of course it did not work out as well as it should have been, throwing an error in my face and forcing me to call up Kobo (Italy) to have my accounts connected and the books ported.

The same year, I end up buying a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition, which is a pretty good tablet and has a great digitizer. Samsung ships Google Play in full (Store, Movies, Music, Books) but at the same time install its own App, Video, Music and Book store apps, it’s not surprising. But it does not take six months for them to decide that it’s not their greatest idea, in May this year, Samsung announced the turn down of their Music and Books stores — outside of South Korea at least. In this case there is no handover of the content to other providers, so any content bought on those platforms is just gone.

Not completely in vain; if you still have access to a Samsung device (and if you don’t, well, you had no access to the content anyway), a different kind of almost-compensation kicks in: the Korean company partnered with Amazon of all bookstores — surprising given that they are behind the new “Nook Tablet” by Barnes & Noble. Beside a branded «Kindle for Samsung» app, they provide one out of a choice of four books every month — the books are taken from Amazon’s KDP Select pool as far as I can tell, which is the same pool used as a base for the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library and the Kindle Unlimited offerings; they are not great but some of them are enjoyable enough. Amazon is also keeping honest and does not force you to read the books on your Samsung device — I indeed prefer reading from my Kindle.

Now the question is: how do you loop back all this to multimedia? Sure books are entertaining but they are by definition a single media, unless you refer to the Kindle Edition of American Gods. Well, for me it’s still the same problem of fiefdoms that Mike referred to; indeed every store used to be a walled garden for a long while, then Adobe came and conquered most with ePub and ADEPT — but then between Apple and their iBooks (which uses its own, incompatible DRM), and Amazon with the Kindle, the walls started crumbling down. Nowadays plenty of publishers allow you to buy the book, in ePub and usually many other formats at the same time, without DRM, because the publishers don’t care which device you want to read your book on (a Kindle, a Kobo, a Nook, an iPad, a Sony Reader, an Android tablet …), they only want for you to read the book, and get hooked, and buy more books.

Somehow the same does not seem to work for video content, although it did work to an extent, for a while at least, with music. But this is a different topic.

The reason why I’m posting this right now is that just today I got an email from Samsung that they are turning down their video store too — now their “Samsung Hub” platform gets to only push you games and apps, unless you happen to live in South Korea. It’s interesting to see how the battles between giants is causing small players to just get off the playing fields… but at the same time they bring their toys with them.

Once again, there is no compensation; if you rented something, watch it by the end of the year, if you bought something, sorry, you won’t be able to access it after new year. It’s a tough world. There is a lesson, somewhere, to be learnt about this.

The odyssey of making an eBook

Please note, if you’re reading this post on Gentoo Universe, that this blog is syndicated in its full English content; including posts like this which is, at this point, the status of a project that I have to call commercial. So don’t complain that you read this on “official Gentoo website” as Universe is quite far from being an official website. I could understand the complaint if it was posted on Planet Gentoo.

I mused last week about the possibility of publishing Autotools Mythbuster as an eBook — after posting the article I decided to look into which options I had for self-publishing, and, long story short, I ended up putting it for sale on Amazon and on Lulu (which nowadays handles eBooks as well). I’ve actually sent it to Kobo and Google Play as well, but they haven’t finished publishing it yet; Lulu is also taking care of iBooks and Barnes & Nobles.

So let’s first get the question out of the way: the pricing of the eBook has been set to $4.99 (or equivalent) on all stores; some stores apply extra taxes (Google Play would apply 23% VAT in most European countries; books are usually 4% VAT here in Italy, but eBooks are not!), and I’ve been told already that at least from Netherlands and Czech Republic, the Kindle edition almost doubles in price — that is suboptimal for both me and you all, as when that happens, my share is reduced from 70 to 35% (after expenses of course).

Much more interesting than this is, though, the technical aspect of publishing the guide as an eBook. The DocBook Stylesheets I’ve been using (app-text/docbook-xsl-ns-stylesheets) provide two ways to build an ePub file: one is through a pure XSLT that bases itself off the XHTML5 output, and only creates the file (leaving to the user to zip them up), the other is a one-call-everything-done through a Ruby script. The two options produce quite different files, respectively in ePub 3 and ePub 2 format. While it’s possible to produce an ePub 3 book that is compatible with older readers, as an interesting post from O’Reilly delineates, but doing so with the standard DocBook chain is not really possible, which is a bummer.

At the end, while my original build was with ePub 3 (which was fine for both Amazon and Google Play), I had to re-build it again for Lulu which requires ePub 2 — it might be worth noting that Lulu says that it’s because their partners, iBookstore and Nook store, would refuse the invalid file, as they check the file with epubcheck version 1… but as O’Reilly says, iBooks is one of the best implementation of ePub 3, so it’s mostly an artificial limitation, most likely caused by their toolchain or BN’s. At the end, I think from the next update forward I’ll stick with ePub 2 for a little while more.

On the other hand, getting these two to work also got me to have a working upgrade path to XHTML 5, which failed for me last time. The method I’ve been using to know exactly which chapters and sections to break on their own pages on the output, was the manual explicit chunking through the chunk.toc file — this is not available for XHTML5, but it turns out there is a nicer method by just including the processing instructions in the main DocBook files, which works with both the old XHTML1 and the new XHTML5 output, as well as ePub 2 and ePub 3. While the version of the stylesheet that generated the website last is not using XHTML5 yet, it will soon do that, as I’m working on a few more changes (among which the overdue Credits section).

One of the thing that I had to be more careful with, with ePub 2, were the “dangling links” to sections I planned but haven’t written yet. There are a few in both the website and the Kindle editions, but they are gone for the Lulu (and Kobo, whenever they’ll make it available) editions. I’ve been working a lot last week to fill in these blanks, and extend the sections, especially for what concerns libtool and pkg-config. This week I’ll work a bit more on the presentation as well, since I still lack a real cover (which is important for eBook at least), and there are a few things to fix on the published XHTML stylesheet as well. Hopefully, before next week there will be a new update for both website and ebooks that will cover most of this, and more.

The final word has to clarify one thing: both Amazon and Google Books put the review on hold the moment when they found the content available already online (mostly on my website and at Gitorious), and asked me to confirm how that was possible. Amazon unlocked the review just a moment later, and published by the next day; Google is still processing the book (maybe it’ll be easier when I’ll make the update and it’ll be an ePub 2 everywhere, with the same exact content and a cover!). It doesn’t seem to me like Lulu is doing anything like that, but it might just have noticed that the content is published on the same domain as the email address I was registered with, who knows?

Anyway to finish it off, once again, the eBook version is available at Amazon and Lulu — both versions will come with free update: I know Amazon allows me to update it on the fly and just require a re-download from their pages (or devices), I’ll try to get them to notify the buyers, otherwise it’ll just be notifying people here. Lulu also allows me to revise a book, but I have no idea whether they will warn the buyers and whether they’ll provide the update.. but if that’s not the case, just contact me with the Lulu order identifier and I’ll set up so that you get the updates.

The misery of the ePub format

I often assume that most of the people reading my blog have been reading it for a long enough time that they know a few of my quirks, one of which is my “passion” for digital distribution, and in particular my liking of eBooks over printed books. This passion actually stems from the fact I’d like to be able to move out of my current home soonish, and the least “physical” stuff I have to bring with me, the better.

I started buying eBooks back in 2010, when I discovered my Sony Reader PRS-505 (originally only capable of reading Sony’s own format) was updated to be able to read the “standard” ePub format, protected with Adobe’s Digital Editions DRM (ADEPT). One of my first suppliers for books in that format was WHSmith, the British bookstore chain. At the end I bought six books from them: Richard Dawkins’s The God Delusion, Nick Harkaway’s The Gone-Away World (which I read already, but wanted a digital copy of, after giving away my hardcopy to a friend of mine), and four books of The Dresden Files.

After a while, I had to look at other suppliers for a very simple reason: WHSmith started requiring me a valid UK post code, which I obviously don’t have. I then moved on to Kobo since they seemed to have a more varied selection, and weren’t tied to the geographical distribution of the UK vendor.

Here I got one of my first disappointments with the ePub “standard”: one of the books I bought from Kobo earlier, Douglas Adams’s The Salmon of Doubt I still haven’t been able to read!

(I really wish Kobo at least replaced the book on their catalogue, since even their applications can’t read it, or otherwise I would like some store credit to get a different book, since that one can’t be read with their own applications.)

Over time, I came to understand that the ePub specifications are just too lax to make it a good format: there are a number of ePub files that are broken simply because the ZIP file is “corrupted” (the names within the records don’t match); a few required me to re-package them to be readable by the Reader; and a few more are huge just because they decide to get their own copy of DejaVu font family in the zip file itself. Of course to fix any of these issues, you also have to take the DRM out of the picture, which is luckily very easy for this format.

Today, Kobo is once again the protagonist of a disappointment, a huge one, in terms of digital distribution; together with WHSmith. But first let’s take a step back to last week.

While in the United States with Luca, I got my hands on a Kindle (the version with keyboard); why? Well, from one side I was starting to be irked by the long list of issues I noted earlier about ePub books, but on the other hand, a few books such as Ian Fleming’s classic Bond novels were not available on Kobo or other ePub suppliers, while they were readily available on Amazon… plus a few of the books I could find on both Kobo and Amazon were slightly cheaper on the latter. I already started reading Fleming’s novels on the iPad through Amazon’s app, but I don’t like reading on a standard LCD.

Coming back home, we passed through London Heathrow; Luca went to look for a book to read on the way home, and we went to the WHBook shop there… and I was surprised to see it was now selling Kobo’s own reader device (the last WHSmith shop I was at, a couple of years ago, was selling Sony exclusively). This sounded strange, considering that WHSmith and Kobo were rivals, for me in particular but in general as well.

I wasn’t that far off, when I smelled something fishy; indeed, tonight I received a mail from WHSmith telling me they joined forces with Kobo, and that they will no longer supply eBooks on their webshop. The format being what it is, if they no longer kept the shop, you’d be found without a way to re-download or eBooks, which is why it is important for a digital distributor to be solid for me.. turns out that WHSmith is not as solid as I supposed. So they suggest you to make an account at Kobo (unless you have one already, like I did) so that they can transfer your books on that account.

Lovely! For me that was very good news, since having the books on my Kobo account means not only being able to access them as ePub (which I had already), but also that I could read them on their apps for Android and iPad, as well as on their own website (very Amazon-y of them). Unfortunately there is a problem: out of the six books I bought at WHSmith, they only let me transfer… two!

Seems like that, even though WHSmith decided to give (or sell) its customers to Kobo, as well as leaving them to provide their ebook offering instead, their partnership does not cover the distribution rights of the books they used to sell. This means that for instance the four Dresden Files novels I bought from WHSmith, that were being edited, even digitally, by the British publisher, are not available to the Canadian store Kobo, who only list the original RoC offerings.

This brings up two whole issues: the first is that unless your supplier is big enough that you can rely on it to exists forever, you shouldn’t trust DRM; luckily for me on the ePub side the DRM is so shallow that I don’t really care for its presence, and on the other hand I foresee Amazon’s DRM to be broken way before they start to crumble. The second issue is that even in the market of digital distribution, which is naturally a worldwide, global market, the regional limitations are making it difficult to have fair offerings; again Amazon seems to sidestep this issue, as it appears to me like there is no book available only on one region in their Kindle offerings: the Italian Kindle store covers all the American books as well.

The second best thing about standards: different implementations

The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose from.
Andrew S. Tanenbaum

The quote from Tanenbaum is a classic, something that most developers at some point in their career will have to face. But I’d like to expand on that; taking into consideration Open Standards as well. Most Free Software developers (and, argh, advocates!) will agree that Open Standards are a very good thing; make sure that they are fully documented, and let people develop royalty-free implementations, and you got a win.

Or do you? As the title of this post let you know, there is one further problem, with the standards to choose from: their implementation. I’ve already delved into a number of problems related to standards and their implementation; for instance the KWord vs OpenOffice problem, with the two using (at the time they started boasting OpenDocument support) two completely different, non-interoperable methods to define bullet-lists. And again with the inconsistent SVG implementations that cause the same file to appear in vastly different ways, without even an error reported, with multiple software.

And eBooks are nothing different either; let’s leave alone the problem with formatting them (for instance, O’Reilly books are easily readable, but are actually formatting “randomly” for me, compared to others; or The Dragon Reborn which probably underwent an OCR pass, given that Thom sometimes became Torn). I’ve already ranted about DTBook ebooks but this time I’m seriously pissed.

Let me explain again the whole DTBook problem first, because it provides a basic context for the trouble that follows right now. I have a PRS-505 Sony Reader; when I bought it, it only supported PDFs (sort-of) and Sony’s own BBeB/LRF format. Thankfully, Sony updated the firmware to add support for the ePub format, which is supposedly an open standard and should have a number of working implementations, on various operating systems and hardware devices. Apple’s iPad among others is supposed to read ePub files. So what’s the catch?

Well, first of all, since I called in Apple’s iPad, there is the problem of DRM; ePub by itself does not really define a DRM scheme; O’Reilly does not use any DRM in their electronic media (bless them), and Apple does not support DRM-locked ePub files either (and as far as I know they provide no DRM for their files either, but I don’t have a device to test it myself). On the other hand, most online bookstores, and the devices such as the Sony Reader or Kobo’s eReader, support Adobe’s DRM scheme, technically called ADEPT, but marketed as “Adobe Digital Editions”. Of course, as far as I know at least, there is no open source software that can deal with ADEPT-locked files, although there is code out there that allows you to unlock the files once you fetch your personal encryption key out of an enabled system.

Okay, let’s leave DRM out now, and speak about the format itself; ePub files are ZIP files, not tremendously different from an OpenDocument file.. it actually comes with the same META-INF directory and mimetype file. Within that, you have a series of XML files, with the metadata of the book, the Table of Contents, a filename for the cover file, and the list of files with the actual book’s content. A note here: at least The Dragon Reborn seems to be a corrupted ZIP files for both unzip and the inept script, but is read fine by the Reader Library, and by the the Reader itself.

The content files can be of different formats; the most common case is (X)HTML; which as you might expect is the easiest to support, given the wide range of software rendering HTML out there. But a different format, called DTBook, was designed to support text-to-speech reading of audiobooks. Files can easily be called ePub, even though the actual content is in DTBook, and not supported by most devices and software; neither the Reader nor Calibre support that format, and can’t thus read the copy I bought of The Salmon of Doubt (sigh!).

Something even stranger happened when I bought (with a $2 discount, as this time it worked) Sourcery by Terry Pratchett … I started the series a year or two ago, but rather than getting the books, at the time I got the audiobooks version to get some sleep (I’m still doing the same thing, over an year and a half later… whenever I don’t have my iPod on during the night, I wake up feeling worse than when I went to sleep, because of bad nightmares…).. Sourcery is the only one that I haven’t been able to listen in its entirety since I started (well, I also didn’t listen to Mort and rather read it as eBook already). Unfortunately the downloaded ePub, even though not resulting corrupt for what unzip is concerned, cannot be viewed on the Reader, just like the DTBook version it reports a “Page error”, shows no Table of Content, lists a start and end page of 1.

After un-locking the file with inept; I could load it on Calibre and.. it actually reads fine. So the file is a valid ePub book, why on earth would the Reader not read it at all? Not something I can answer without having access to the sources obviously. Luckily, at least this time I can read my book, since Calibre could process it and create a new ePub copy that the Reader actually seem to load and read.

Alas. I really have nothing else I could possibly say.

An open letter to Kobo

Kobo is an interesting website that sells ePub e-books, compatible with Adobe Digital Editions (so, DRM’d), of which I wrote already before — unfortunately a couple of interactions with the website and its features lately have been slightly upsetting. So I’d like to simply express my opinion about it…

Dear Kobo,

Looking for a website that would sell me ePub books I could read on my Sony Reader device, I have to say that yours is the one that is the most appealing; the other decent option for novels and non-fiction (non-technical) books is the British WHSmith, but their website is a bit difficult to grok and feels a bit.. old style.

It also helps the fact that the Dollar is still lower than the Euro, while the Pound is higher again, which means that in general – minus strange cases like the sixth Hitchhiker’s book “And Another Thing” that seems to cost more on your website than from other stores – the price is quite good for me. I’m also pretty happy that I can get books released in America but not yet in Europe, like it happened with Cyber War which I positively enjoyed.

Unfortunately, things started to get strange when I bought “The Salmon of Doubt”… and had been unable to read it on my Reader; it turned out that I had to work around the DRM to be able to find the cause of the problem: the internal format of all the other books I bought is XHTML, while that one uses DTBook. Somehow, both the Sony software and your website allow it to work, but it fails badly both on the Reader and on your own Android application. Which probably means, you also didn’t plan about it. I wonder if your eReader device actually reads those.

The other problem I noticed, was that beside a number of books not available from you, but available on, again, WHSmith, for which I obviously can’t say much (either you have them or you don’t, like any other book store), there is an annoying trouble in getting chapters of book series. For instance I could get Jim Butcher’s Grave Peril from you, but then I had to turn to WHSmith for Summer Knight, Death Masks and Blood Rites, since you don’t have them. Similarly yesterday I noted that while I got Robin Hobb’s “Assassin’s Apprentice”, the second volume (Royal Assassin) is also not available, but the third (Assassin’s Quest) is.

It is an annoyance – especially since I prefer getting books on your site also because they are available on the web to read with my Linux laptop, and on my Android phone, while WHSmith’s books I can only load on the Reader or read with the official applications, minus breaking the DRM again – but a minor one at that.

It goes a bit worse when I received last week a promotional email with a $2 discount, not a lot but since I’m actually quite through The Dragon Reborn (for the second try, the first one I abandoned two years ago in the hospital), I thought it would have been a good chance to find something new to read after that. I tried it a couple of nights ago with a few of the books I bookmarked, but.. for all of them it reported expired or not applicable.

Tonight, you reply me on twitter saying that only a subset of books are available and provide me a list … but once again, trying to apply the code to two books in that list, reports that it is expired or not available. For sure, it wasn’t expired, since the mail said it would expire at “29 June 2010 11:59pm EST” – and at the time it was something like 17 EDT – but at the same time, the mail has no reference to the list I was given nor either any reference to the discount applying to a subset of the books (well, it was understandable anyway).

At the end, I bought the one book, that I didn’t know already, from that list that looked interesting and relevant to my areas of interest; for the curious it was Free by Chris Anderson, without the discount it was still at a decent price. But all of this feels like quite the kerfuffle.

I think that it would be good for both you and your customers if you can actually get these things sorted out properly; as I said I’m very happy to continue being your customer, I don’t even care about promotional codes (after all, $2 is almost nothing), but it doesn’t feel right

Oh and if you happen to be able to… could you please make a Linux application to download Adobe Digital Edition files? Thank-you!

Again on procuring eBooks

I know that most of you who read my blog daily don’t care about my toying with eBooks, and only read it for the technical articles; on the other hand, I feel like I can at least talk a bit about that, given that most of my personal life is uninteresting and thus I rarely write of that at all.

Anyway, you might remember I had some trouble finding where to buy eBooks and at the end I settled with – for non-technical books that is – WHSmith and Kobo as they both sell Adobe Digital Edition ePub books. Finding mainstream non-DRM ePub seems to be impossible; maybe only on Apple’s iBooks store, but it still doesn’t warrant me getting an iPad to try — even though, if you have an iPad or iPhone and can tell me whether that’s the case, I’d be curious. Finding a second-hand old-generation iPhone shouldn’t be too expensive and if that can get me access to mainstream non-DRM’d ePubs it might be worth it.

Anyway, the two sites above actually give me enough access that I don’t miss most of what I usually read; indeed, Kobo actually provided me with a few curious readings that I might as well try. Also, even though the Dollar is rising again, buying the books from Kobo is, for me, slightly cheaper than WHSmith.

Also, the fact that they are no simple eBook store makes them more intriguing; I’m not that enticed by their eReader (given I have already my PRS-505 and I’m not going to drop it any time soon), but the fact that they have applications available for a number of platforms (but not Linux, dang it! If they did, and it supported activation of Adobe DRM’d ePubs, they would be so great I could consider getting the eReader if only to fund them further). Even if I will probably not use those, I can still enjoy the fact that they let me read the books I buy on the web with any browser, on my reader in ePub format (and thus anywhere the ePub format can be read!) and since a few days also on my Milestone thanks to their Android application.

A word about the DRM here; while I’m one of those people who, I said already, prefer to abide to restrictions as long as they are an acceptable tradeoff (for instance the audiobooks DRM on iTunes is acceptable because they do cost a lot less than on unencumbered form). While I can understand the reason why most publishers won’t even consider not using DRM on the files, and I accept that at least this way I can get eBooks at all, I don’t think the tradeoff is useful to the user in this case. Indeed, given the fact that not all devices using ePub supports Adobe Digital Editions, it can be quite harsh to have it applied. add that to the not all ePubs are the same and thus you might have to access the content of the archive to change it into something usable, and you get the picture. Luckily, the ADEPT DRM has been long broken so it’s not difficult to get clean files.

Anyway, as I said, Kobo looks a nice choice to me because of the presence of the additional applications (just to put it into perspective, while I’m not considering buying an iPad, were I to, I could still read the books I bought from Kobo, without going around the DRM, as they have an iPad application); for instance I could easily read The Salmon of Doubt from my browser, even though the ePub version uses the infamous DTBook format above. Unfortunately they don’t have *everything*… not yet at least.

Anyway, last night I didn’t sleep so I could finish reading Assassin’s Apprentice (somebody suggested this to me a few years back; on the other hand I decided to read this because me and some friends were to a fair where also the author was…). Nice book indeed, just a bit “slow” (took me almost a month to read it fully, and it was just 400 pages). Next step, though, I wanted to come back to Dresden’s Files; Butcher’s style is enchanting. Three books out, I was up to read Summer KnightGrave Peril I got from Kobo so I assumed they had the next as well; somehow, they don’t. So at the end I got it from WHSmith; it bears little difference, but it still strikes me as odd.

And in all this, there seems to be no shop for Italian eBooks; sigh. If only ChiareLettere had ePubs available.. their books are quite bulky and I would love to give them away and trading them for digital copies of them. I wonder if I should get more (technical) skills about this kind of publishing and propose to handle that kind of stuff myself. I would also know where to start, maybe.

Technical eBooks? Scarcer than I’d have said!

Do you remember I went back to using the Reader with proper (ePub) content? It also turned out pretty well when I could get a newly-released book even before it’s released in Europe (and for a much lower price).

A month after resuming this, I have to accept an absurd reality: it’s much easier to find novels than technical books in ePub format! Now it is true that most of the O’Reilly catalogue is available in ePub format (one exception being CJKV Information Processing which, for the complexity of the script, is only available as PDF — and it would still have been pretty expensive, if I couldn’t make it to the 1-day offer the other day of getting any eBook for $10; for that price, even just a PDF is good enough), but they seem to be an exception.

Indeed, Addison Wesley does not seem to have their catalogue available as eBook at all! And they tend to have some very interesting books – some of which I read thanks to the gifts received – if they had them available as eBook, I would probably be buying a few more of them!

Tonight I was also looking at MIT Press since I would like to convert my current shelf to eBooks, for those titles that I’m still interesting to have around, and which are available as eBook obviously; Using OpenMP is one of them — my idea was to know ho much they would cost me as eBook, which is usually a fraction of their original price, and “sell” them for the same price to interested friends. While they do have an eBook store, it doesn’t have their older titles, and it leaves a lot to be desired.

My reason for wanting to convert what I have already is that I’m getting ready to pack and get the hell away from home; nots of things are going on and I’m in the middle of a very nasty family situation. I’ll be looking for my luck elsewhere, most likely in Turin, hopefully later on this year. But before leaving, I’m trying to get rid of some baggage, both psychological and physical; books are something that, while I’d be sad splitting from, I cannot afford to bring with me when I’ll be moving.

Incidentally, I’m in a bit of a pinch with CDs and DVDs as well… I already rip all my CDs and the music DVDs to bring them with me more easily on the iPod — but I don’t want to get rid of the originals; I guess that once I move I might still get some “physical storage space” here, to keep them. I already moved to buying music digitally – through the iTunes store, thankfully they don’t have DRM any more! – but audiobooks are still crippled protected, as they tell you, and metal loses some edges when encoded. Let’s not even get into digitally-distributed movies. And yes, I’m the kind of person who gladly pays for content.

On the other hand, for what concerns fiction and non-fiction books, there are quite a few possible stores, such as -WHSmith- Kobo and Waterstones — the only problem I got with them is that none of them supports a wishlist; I’d love to replace the one I have now on Amazon with one for eBook: they’d be cheaper and I’d have less trouble bringing them around.

Anyway, I’m still baffled by the lack of vast archives of technical eBooks.